Tag Archives: Humbucker

Lollar Charlie Christian Pick Up

In the world of aftermarket Pick Ups, Lollar is a breath of fresh air.  Started by expert guitar luthier, Jason Lollar, Lollar specializes in boutique PUs for guitar, bass, and steel guitar.  Unlike most aftermarket PU companies, which are geared toward high output, modern tones, Lollar makes classic, vintage-styled PUs – using modern technology to achieve classic tonality.  Their product range is probably the most unusual and diverse of any PU company, making Stratocaster, Telecaster, Humbucker, P-90,  Jazzmaster, Charlie Christian, and “Miscellaneous” PUs.  Within these categories are many classics, like the Stratocaster Vintage Blackface, Dog Ear P-90, ’52 Tele Neck PU, and special PUs inspired by Peter Green, Johnny Smith, and Charlie Christian.  Jason Lollar also makes some unique, one of a kind PUs, like the Chicago Steel, designed for slide playing, Single-coil within a Humbucker, and “the Broiler,” which has a bell-like tone a la John Lennon.  Ultimately, Lollar is constantly pushing the boundaries of traditional PUs, creating exciting and new inventions to compliment any playing style and achieve any tone.

For those of you who don’t know Charlie Christian, he is one of the original guitar legends.  Christian was a key developer of Bebop, the language of improvisation, guitar technique, and was one of the very first people ever to take an amplified guitar solo!  He was most well-known as a member of Benny Goodman’s Sextet, one of the first integrated bands, but has become legendary for his influence at Minton’s Playhouse in Harlem – the birthplace of Bebop.  Here, in after hours jam sessions, Christian would exchange choruses with Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Thelonius Monk, and other Bebop greats, as they developed this new style of Jazz.  Christian’s improvisational style is his greatest legacy.  Often said to be “horn-like,” Christian was one of the first guitarists to play single-note solos instead of chords, emulating the solos of a horn.  Through his single note improvisational style, Christian invented many phrases, licks, and ideas that would become building blocks for the language of Bebop.  His influence can be most strongly heard in Wes Montgomery, who learned to play by transcribing Christian’s solos.  Adding to his legend, Charlie Christian died at age 25 from tuberculosis, leaving an incredible legacy behind.

The style of the early pick ups used in the first electric guitars have become known as Charlie Christian PUs.  Preceding Humbucking technology, these PUs were single coils, but had a different sound than the modern-day single coils you would find in a Strat.  They had a depth and richness more akin to a P-90, and a unique fullness that set them apart from other PUs.  Today, Lollar makes Charlie Christian PUs designed to be housed in a traditional arch-top guitar, but their most popular CC model is designed for neck position in a Telecaster.  This is the PU I have put in my Telecaster, and it sounds amazing.  Putting a Lollar CC in a Tele achieves a deep, bluesy tone a la Ted Greene, Keith Richards, and even Jimi Hendrix.  Although you lose some of the “spank” associated with the Telecaster, you gain a new dimension of tone that is sweeter and richer than the conventional Telecaster sound.  I originally used this PU to adapt my Tele for a Jazz setting, but as I have experimented more, I find it’s a perfect sound for Blues, Rock, Pop, and Folk-Rock.  It makes my Tele sound more like a Strat, but even more harmonically rich.  The only downside was the shape of this PU required my local shop to cut my pick guard, an operation they weren’t too familiar with.  However, they learned, and did just fine, leaving me with a unique and great sounding modification to my Telecaster.

So if you’re interested in after market pick ups that will help your guitar, and your tone, stand out from the crowd, check out Lollar Pick Ups!

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Gibson Custom ES-359, Vintage Sunburst

Like a lot of guitarists, and musicians in general, I went through a period when I was fascinated by Jazz music.  Not that I don’t love and appreciate Jazz now, but during this phase I ate, drank and slept Jazz 24/7.  My Jazz guitar heroes were Pat Martino, Grant Green, Wes Montgomery, Kenny Burrell, John Scofield and Jonathan Kreisberg, to name a few, and like my idols, I needed an appropriate Jazz axe.  Eventually, I acquired the gold standard of Jazz guitars, a secondhand Gibson ES-175.  This was a beautiful, full hollow-body guitar, with black P-90s and a AAA Flame Maple top.  However, it soon grew wearisome.  It was huge, and carrying it to gigs and rehearsals was a major pain.  Also, because of the size of the body, it would feed back at even moderately high volumes, and had such a dark tone that it was hardly applicable outside of the Jazz idiom.  That ES-175 served me well on many Jazz gigs, but after a while I decided I needed a guitar that was more convenient, smaller, and could play Jazz, Rock or any other style equally well.  That’s when I came across the ES-359.

After selling my ES-175 on eBay, I had a sizable sum to put towards my next purchase, but still nothing compared to what would be necessary to buy a brand new Gibson Custom Shop guitar.  One thing I had learned was that if I was going to spend a large sum on a guitar, it had to be perfect – no exceptions.  For me, that meant it played well and looked amazing – no P-90s or AAA Flame Maple top (cool, not my favorite finish).  Luckily, I had located a Gibson ES-359 at Guitar Center on Pico Blvd., but it was out of my price range and had a AAA Flame Maple top.  Now (and especially at the time) ES-359s are both a very recent and somewhat of a novelty model, making them extremely hard to find second-hand.  Nonetheless, after quite an effort, an employee at the Guitar Center Platinum Room in Hollywood located a used Vintage Sunburst ES-359 in the computer system.  It had been returned by a dissatisfied customer somewhere in Kentucky, but he assured me that 95% of returns were not due to malfunctions, but incompatible buyers.  So we made the transaction, I got my discounted price, and about a week later the guitar arrived – flawless.

As Gibson says, “there is no truer sign of the Gibson Custom Shop’s dedication to improvement and innovation.”  The ES-359 is most closely related to the ES-339, but both are offshoots of the more popular ES-335 model, the main difference being that the “9”s have a much smaller body.  Although it still retains the tonal qualities of a larger semi-hollow-body guitar, the Es-359 comes in a much more compact package.  In contrast to the ES-339, the ES-359 is its better looking brother.  With gold hardware, Grover tuners, mother-of-pearl block inlays, and a unique neck profile most similar to the BB King signature “Lucille” model, this guitars looks and feels spectacular.  The cream binding and tortoise-shell pick guard also give it a classic charm.  One of the most unusual things about this guitar is the audio taper pots designed to persevere high-end as volume decreases, giving it “a consistently sweeter, brighter, punchier tone than other guitars of its ilk as it gets quieter.”  With two ’57 Classic Humbuckers and a three-way selector switch, this guitar can soulfully accomplish any style, from Jazz to Blues to Rock N Roll to Country.  And let’s not forget it is absolutely gorgeous.

So if you’re in the market for a semi-hollow-body guitar but want something unique, if you want a guitar for your Jazz and Rock gigs, or if you just want one of the greatest guitars made by one of the greatest guitar manufacturers, look no further than the Gibson ES-359.

For more on the ES-359 check out the Gibson Website.

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The Ibanez RG 350 DX – To shred, or not to shred?

Like many guitar players, when I began, I was all about the classics – Fender and Gibson.  Nothing appealed less to me than a Parker, BC Rich, or even Ibanez.  These companies were associated with a mentality I didn’t like – I didn’t want to sacrifice soul or character for playability or a Floyd Rose.  But as I progressed as a player, and became more interested in “shredding,” it seemed as though my old friends just couldn’t handle the heat.  Single coil PUs with hum, low radius necks, heavy strings – not a recipe to sound like Eddie Van Halen.  Plus, I was ignoring one major factor – I thought that “soul” came from the guitar, when it really comes from the player.  Since then, I have witnessed many character-less solos on classic guitars, and some extremely emotional, original ones on the newer breeds.

Eventually, my interest in the other side prompted me to make a purchase.  I went on eBay and bought a factory second, White Ibanez 350DX for about $350.  It was the first guitar I ever purchased with a locking nut, “Floyd Rose”-esque system.  At first it was weird – the neck was so thin and flat, there were 24 frets, there was a usable whammy bar – but soon it became one of my favorite axes.  I loved the way it felt, but the stock PUs were terrible, so I replaced them.  Knowing I would hardly use the middle single coil PU, I just put a Seymour Duncan Jazz SH-2 at neck position and a Seymour Duncan JB at bridge.  With this change, this guitar became my weapon of choice.

Now, a good guitarist can play on any guitar – but playing with this axe was like using training wheels.  So many techniques – legato, tapping, string skipping – that were previously impossible on my Strat or Tele were suddenly pretty easy – and sounding good!  Using high output humbuckers, I could finally achieve a distorted tone with cleanliness and clarity.  This guitar also became my number one studio axe.  It’s totally silent when not being played, and can create a wide array of sounds, from sparkling cleans to death metal overdrive.  And the best part – after playing on this guitar for a while, I could suddenly do all these complicated techniques on my classic guitars.  It was as if practicing these techniques on a guitar built for them allowed me to better understand their mechanics, and how to implement them on any guitar.  Basically, I am so thankful that I purchased this guitar.  It has taught me so much about my own playing, and how to coax classic charm out of even the most modern beast.

In conclusion, I advise every guitar player to spend a little time with an axe like this.  They are generally foreign made, very inexpensive, and easy to find second hand.  I equate them to “rice rocket” racing cars – they are the perfect blank slate, ready to be modified into the ultimate Rock machine.  You can learn a lot from having 24 frets and a high neck radius, and may be surprised how much “tone” you can actually get from one of these “shredders.”  If you’re into modern guitar playing, yielding a weapon like this is a must.

For more on Ibanez, check out the Ibanez website.

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